Eventually, in their marriage contract, they agreed that, no matter what, a certain amount of money with which Mark had contracted the marriage would be reserved for his children. Ellen received written assurances that he would write a will saying that in the event of death, after this initial sum of money had been distributed to his children, his remaining property would be divided in two, with part of Ellen and the remaining part being divided between her children. If she refuses to acknowledge the fact that she is asking you to take on most of the risk and is still not ready to sign a fair and reasonable agreement, you have to ask yourself: are you willing to marry someone who will only engage with you if the odds are stacked in her favor? Many women and men oppose marriage contracts on the grounds that the bride and groom should implicitly trust each other. That is a legitimate objection. It is not irrational for a woman to think that you are questioning her reliability by asking for a prenup. Nevertheless, marriage contracts can help a couple decide how to handle future debts and income, which is no small consideration. They don`t want to have marriages with anyone and get away from all debts, which can happen to a man during a bad day in family court. “I`ve heard all kinds of approaches. What normally seems to work best is the truth,” Kessler said. “Say something like, `My family and I have always discussed and agreed that if I or my brother ever got married, we would sign a prenup` or `My best friend went through a horrible divorce and all he remembers is that his lawyer said, `If they had only signed a marriage contract.`” Of course, this argument is a bit aggressive to use it with the woman you love.

Here`s a milder answer: “I don`t intend to divorce you. That`s why I marry you. I want to know that we are both determined to get through the tough times instead of moving away from each other. A marriage contract can ensure that we are both incentivized to fight for marriage if it ever becomes difficult. In a recent survey of the American Academy of Marriage Lawyers, 62 percent of lawyers surveyed said that over the past three years, they have seen an increase in the number of clients looking for prenups. . . .