Since then, they have joined other public sector employees in calling for an end to the 2% wage increase cap, which came into effect in 2011. Negotiations on a new Corporate Negotiation Agreement (EBA) began at the end of last year. AEU SA Chairman Howard Spreadbury said the government had also proposed removing an earlier obligation for a number of funding issues in a new deal. He says there is a fundamental consensus on key issues, including moderating the impact of digital communication, respecting educators` holidays and professional violence. Our school assistants work under the ACT Public Sector Administrative and Related Classifications Enterprise Agreement. Members called for adequate workloads, better pay for all classifications, secure employment, more teachers to reduce class sizes, improved provisions to attract and retain staff in countries, address gender inequality and domestic violence, and fair treatment in the workplace. ACT members are also in favour of additional funding to support school leaders. . The agreement is now subject to approval by the Fair Work Commission. The new agreement will enter into force seven days after its approval by the Fair Work Commission. The salary increase will take effect on August 8, 2019 and the refund will take place from August 22. “The goodwill has expired and they want something done about it,” she says.

“They said they wanted more flexibility and less regulation and obviously members were very concerned and concerned that these funding measures would not be guaranteed in the future,” he says. The union actions at the end of last year attracted a lot of attention in the media and Richardson does not remember when such a “fire in the belly” of the members took place. In Tasmania, Southern Australia and the ACT, teachers continue to lobby governments to agree on a level of funding and resources that support their profession to provide quality training. While the Hodgman government dreams of Tasmania as an “educational state”, its teachers are the lowest paid in Australia and the government has gradually cut funding for public schools. . . .