The British government is becoming more and more provocative. This weekend, the chief Brexit negotiator, David Frost, said he was not afraid to escape trade negotiations with the European Union – and that was just the beginning. On Monday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson set a deadline of mid-October for an agreement between Britain and the Bloc. If there were none, he said, the UK would be preparing for a future without a deal. The growing audacity on behalf of British officials comes ahead of the planned publication of an internal market law that would undermine the fundamental principles of the recent withdrawal pact. The behaviour could be interpreted as bluffing if it were not the Northern Ireland Protocol and the fact that Britain might no longer be able to comply with certain aspects of the withdrawal agreement. One exception is the possibility for two WTO countries to enter into a bilateral trade agreement to give each other preferential rates below WTO rules. That is why an agreement is so important; In the absence of agreements, Britain and the EU cannot simply reduce tariffs and non-tariff barriers between them, as they should do the same for all other WTO countries. If a deal is reached, it could reduce or even avoid higher rates for a no-deal Brexit.

The withdrawal agreement also contains provisions for the United Kingdom to leave the Convention setting the status of European schools, with the United Kingdom bound by the Convention and accompanying regulations on accredited European schools until the end of the last academic year of the transition period. , that is, the end of the spring semester 2020-2021. [20] The British Parliament rejects the agreement for the third time. The UK has until 12 April 2019 to decide how to proceed: the agreement covers issues such as money, citizens` rights, border agreements and dispute settlement. It also includes a transition period and an overview of the future relationship between the UK and the EU. It was published on 14 November 2018 and was the result of the Brexit negotiations. The agreement was approved by the heads of state and government of the other 27 EU countries[9] and by the British government led by Prime Minister Theresa May, but it faced opposition from the British Parliament, which needed approval for ratification. The approval of the European Parliament would also have been necessary. On January 15, 2019, the House of Commons rejected the withdrawal agreement by 432 votes to 202. [10] The House of Commons again rejected the agreement by 391 votes to 242 on 12 March 2019 and rejected it a third time, on 29 March 2019, by 344 votes to 286.

On 22 October 2019, the revised withdrawal agreement negotiated by Boris Johnson`s government approved the first phase in Parliament, but Johnson halted the legislative process when the accelerated approval programme failed to receive the necessary support and announced his intention to declare a general election. [12] On 23 January 2020, Parliament ratified the agreement by adopting the withdrawal agreement; On 29 January 2020, the European Parliament approved the withdrawal agreement.